Unofficial SJG Archive

The Unofficial Stephen Jay Gould Archive

Unofficial SJG Archive


Bibliography


Gould, S. J. 1977. Ontogeny and Phylogeny. Cambridge MA: Harvard Univ. Press.

—— 1977. Ever Since Darwin. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1980. The Panda's Thumb. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1980. The Evolution of Gryphaea. New York: Ayer Publishing.

—— 1981. The Mismeasure of Man. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1983. Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1985. The Flamingo's Smile. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1987. Time's Arrow, Time's Cycle. Cambridge MA: Harvard Univ. Press.

—— 1987. An Urchin in the Storm: Essays about Books and Ideas. N.Y.: W. W. Norton

—— 1989. Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History. New York: W. W. Norton, 347 pp.

—— 1991. Bully for Brontosaurus. New York: W. W. Norton, 540 pp.

—— 1992. Finders, Keepers: Eight Collectors. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1993. Eight Little Piggies. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 1993. The Book of Life. Preface, pp. 6-21. New York: W. W. Norton (S. J. Gould general editor, 10 contributors).

—— 1995. Dinosaur in a Haystack. New York: Harmony Books.

—— 1996. Full House: The Spread of Excellence From Plato to Darwin. New York: Harmony Books.

—— 1997. Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown. New York: Harmony Books.

—— 1998. Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms. N.Y.: Harmony Books.

—— 1999. Rocks of Ages: Science and Religion in the Fullness of Life. New York: Ballantine Publications.

—— 2000. The Lying Stones of Marrakech. New York: Harmony Books.

—— 2000. Crossing Over: Where Art and Science Meet. New York: Three Rivers Press.

—— 2002. The Structure of Evolutionary Theory. Cambridge MA: Harvard Univ. Press.

—— 2002. I Have Landed: The End of a Beginning in Natural History. New York: Harmony Books.

—— 2003. Triumph and Tragedy in Mudville: A Lifelong Passion for Baseball. New York: W. W. Norton.

—— 2003. The Hedgehog, the Fox, and the Magister's Pox. New York: Harmony Books.

[ Book reviews ]



Selected Papers

Gould, S. J. 1965. Is uniformitarianism necessary? Amer. Jour. Sci. 263: 223-28.

—— 1966. Allometry and size in ontogeny and phylogeny. Biol. Rev. 41: 587-640.

—— 1967. Evolutionary patterns in pelycosaurian reptiles. Evolution 21: 385-401.

—— 1968. Ontogeny and the explanation of form: an allometric analysis. In D. B. Macurda, ed., Paleontological aspects of growth and development, a symposium. Paleont. Soc. Memoir 2 (J. of Paleontology 42 (5), suppl.), 81-98.

—— 1969. An evolutionary microcosm: Pleistocene and Recent history of the land snail P. (Poecilozonites) in Bermuda. Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 138: 407-532.

—— 1970. Evolutionary paleontology and the science of form. Earth-Sci. Rev. 6: 77-119.

—— 1970. Private thoughts of Lyell on progression and evolution. Science 169: 663-664

—— 1971. D'Arcy Thompson and the science of form. New. Literary. Hist. 2: 229-258.

—— 1971. Muscular mechanics and the ontogeny of swimming in scallops. Palaeontology 14 (March): 61-94.

—— 1971. Geometric similarity in allometric growth. American Naturalist 105 (Mar-Apr.): 113-136.

—— 1972. Allometric fallacies and the evolution of Gryphaea. In T. Dobzhansky et al., eds., Evol. Biology 6: 91-118.

—— 1973. The misnamed, mistreated, and misunderstood Irish elk. Natural History. 82 (March): 10-19.

—— 1974. Size and shape. Natural History 83 (January): 20-26.

—— 1974. The origin and function of "bizarre" structures: antler size and skull size in the "Irish Elk" Megaloceros giganteus. Evolution 28: 191-220.

—— 1974. On biological and social determinism. Hist. Sci. 12: 212-20.

—— 1974. Allometry in primates, with emphasis on scaling and the evolution of the brain. In Approaches to Primate Paleobiology, Contrib. Primatol. 5: 244-292.

—— 1975. Velikovsky in collision. Natural History 84 (March): 20-26.

—— 1975. Darwin's big book. Science 188 (May 23): 824-826.

—— 1975. Allometry in primates, with emphasis on scaling and the evolution of the brain. In F. Szalay, ed., Approaches to Primate Paleobiology. Basel: Karger, Vol. 5, pp. 244-92.

—— 1976. Darwin's untimely burial. Natural History 85 (October): 24-30.

—— 1977. Evolution's erratic pace. Natural History 86 (May): 12-16.

—— 1977. The return of hopeful monsters. Natural History 86 (June/July): 22-30. HTML

—— 1977. Eternal metaphors of paleontology. In A. Hallam, Patterns of Evolution as Illustrated by the Fossil Record, Amsterdam, Elsevier, pp. 1-26.

—— 1978. Sociobiology: the art of storytelling. New Scientist 80 (1129): 530-533. PDF Format

—— 1978. Episodic change versus gradualist dogma. Science and Nature 2: 5-12.

—— 1978. Were dinosaurs dumb? New Scientist 87 (July): 266-267.

—— 1978. On the importance of heterochrony for evolutionary biology. Systematic Zoology 28 (2): 224-226.

—— 1978. The great Scablands debate. Natural History 87 (7): 12-18.

—— 1978. Women’s brains. Natural History 87 (8): 44–50.

—— 1978. Flaws in the Victorian veil. New Scientist 82 (Aug. 31): 632-633.

—— 1978. When the unorthodox prevails. New Scientist 82 (Sept. 28): 942-943.

—— 1978. The panda's peculiar thumb. Natural History 87 (November): 20-30. PDF Format HTML

—— 1979. Piltdown revisited. Natural History 88 (March): 86-97.

—— 1979. Mickey Mouse meets Konrad Lorenz. Natural History 88 (May): 30-36. PDF Format

—— 1979. Shades of Lamarck. Natural History 88 (Aug.): 22-28.

—— 1979. Species are not specious. New Scientist 83 (Aug. 2): 374-76.

—— 1979. The Upright Ape. New Scientist 83 (Sept. 6): 738-739.

—— 1980. The Piltdown conspiracy. Natural History 89 (Aug.): 8-28.

—— 1980. The promise of paleobiology as a nomothetic, evolutionary discipline. Paleobiology 6 (1): 96-118. JSTOR Preview

—— 1980. Is a new and general theory of evolution emerging? Paleobiology 6 (1): 119-130.

—— 1980. The evolutionary biology of constraint. Daedalus 109 (2): 39-53. JSTOR Preview

—— 1980. Sociobiology and the theory of natural selection. In G. W. Barlow and J. Silverberg, eds., Sociobiology: Beyond Nature/Nurture? Boulder CO: Westview Press, pp. 257-269.

—— 1980. G. G. Simpson, Paleontology and the Modern Synthesis. In: E. Mayr and W. B. Provine, eds., The Evolutionary Synthesis. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 153-172.

—— 1981. Piltdown in letters. Natural History 90 (June): 12-30.

—— 1981. Evolution as fact and theory. Discover 2 (May): 34-37.

—— 1981. Agassiz in the Galapagos. Natural History 90 (December): 7-14.

—— 1982. Nonmoral nature. Natural History 91 (February): 19-26.

—— 1982. Genesis vs. Geology. The Atlantic Monthly 250 (3): 10-17.

—— 1982. Darwinism and the expansion of evolutionary theory. Science 216 (April 23): 380-387.

—— 1982. A nation of morons. New Scientist 83 (May. 6): .

—— 1982. Change in developmental timing as a mechanism of macroevolution. In J. T. Bonner, ed., Evolution and Development. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 333-346.

—— 1982. The uses of heresey; an introduction to Richard Goldschmidt's "The Material Basis of Evolution," pp. xiii-xlii. New Haven: Yale University Press.

—— 1982. The meaning of punctuated equilibrium and its role in validating a hierarchical approach to macroevolution. In R. Milkman, ed., Perspectives on Evolution. Sunderland MA: Sinauer Associates, pp. 83-104.

—— 1982. The Hottentot Venus. Natural History 91 (10): 20–27.

—— 1982. Introduction. In Theodosius Dobzhansky, Genetics and the origin of species. New York: Columbia University Press, pp. xvii-xxxix.

—— 1983. The hardening of the Modern Synthesis. In: Marjorie Grene, ed., Dimensions of Darwinism. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press, pp. 71-93.

—— 1983. Irrelevance, submission, and partnership: the changing role of paleontology in Darwin's three centennials, and a modest proposal for macroevolution. In D. S. Bendall, ed., Evolution from Molecules to Men. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 347-366.

—— 1984. The Ediacaran experiment. Natural History 93 (2): 14-23.

—— 1984. Carrie Buck's daughter. Natural History 93 (7): 14-18.

—— 1984. Toward the vindication of punctuational change. In W. W. Berggren and J. A. Van Couvering, eds., Catastrophes and Earth History. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, pp. 9-34.

—— 1984. Covariance sets and ordered geographic variation in Cerion from Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao: a way of studying nonadaptation. Syst. Zool. 33 (2): 217-37.

—— 1984. Challenges to Neo-Darwinism and their meaning for a revised view of human consciousness. Tanner Lectures on Human Values. Clare Hall, Cambridge University, pp. 55-73.

—— 1985. The median isn't the message. Discover 6 (June): 40-42.

—— 1985. Not necessarily a wing. Natural History 94 (October): 12-25.

—— 1985. The paradox of the first tier: an agenda for paleobiology. Paleobiology 11 (June): 2-12.

—— 1986. Evolution and the triumph of homology, or why history matters. Amer. Scientist, January-February: 60-69.

—— 1986. Play it again, life. Natural History 95 (February): 18-26.

—— 1986. Children's books; still in my dinosaur phase. The New York Times (Oct. 12), Section 7; Page 36.

—— 1987. Darwinism defined: the difference between fact and theory. Discover 8 (January): 64-70.

—— 1987. The lesson of the dinosaurs: evolution didn't inevitably lead to us. Discover (March).

—— 1987. Life's little joke. Natural History 96 (April): 16-25.

—— 1987. The terrifying normalcy of AIDS. New York Times Magazine 136 (April 19): 32.

—— 1987. The panda's thumb of technology. Natural History 96 (1): 14–23.

—— 1987. Justice Scalia's misunderstanding. Natural History 96 (October): 14-21.

—— 1988. Trends as changes in variance: a new slant on progress and directionality in evolution. Journal of Paleontology 62 (2): 319-329.

—— 1988. The ontogeny of Sewall Wright and the phylogeny of evolution. Isis 79 (297): 273-281.

—— 1988. The streak of streaks. New York Review of Books, August 18, pp. 8-12.

—— 1988. Strike up the Choir!. New York Times magazine, Nov. 6, 100-103.

—— 1989. An essay on a pig roast. Natural History 98 (January): 14-25.

—— 1989. The wheel of fortune and the wedge of progress. Natural History 98 (March): 14-21.

—— 1989. Tires to sandals. Natural History 98 (April): 8-15.

—— 1989. George Canning's left buttock and the origin of species. Natural History 98 (May): 18-23.

—— 1989. The creation myths of Cooperstown. Natural History 98 (November): 14-24.

—— 1990. The Golden Rule—a proper scale for our environmental crisis. Natural History 99 (September): 24-30.

—— 1990. Darwin and Paley meet the Invisible Hand. Natural History 99 (Nov.): 8-16.

—— 1991. Eight (or fewer) little piggies. Natural History 100 (January): 22-29.

—— 1991. Exaptation: a crucial tool for an evolutionary psychology. Journal of Social Issues 47 (3): 43-65.

—— 1991. The disparity of the Burgess Shale arthropod fauna and the limits of cladistic analysis: why we must strive to quantify morphospace. Paleobiology 17 (October): 411-423.

—— 1991. Opus 200. Natural History 100 (August): 12-19.

—— 1991. Fall in the House of Ussher. Natural History 100 (November): 12-21.

—— 1992. The reversal of Hallucigenia. Natural History 101 (January): 12-20.

—— 1992. The paradox of genius. Nature 355 (January): 215-216.

—— 1992. Impeaching a self-appointed judge. Scientific American 267 (1): 118-121.

—— 1992. Dinosaurs in the haystack. Natural History 101 (March 1992): 2-13.

—— 1992. Ontogeny and phylogeny—revisited and reunited. BioEssays 14 (April): 275-79.

—— 1992. Eve and her tree. Discover 13 (July): 32-33.

—— 1992. Punctuated Equilibrium in Fact and Theory. In Albert Somit and Steven Peterson, The Dynamics of Evolution. New York: Cornell University Press, pp. 54-84.

—— 1992. The confusion over evolution. New York Review of Books, Nov. 19, pp. 47-54.

—— 1992. "What is a species?: Endangered Species Act based on unclear scientific definition. Discover 13 (December): 40-44.

—— 1993. The inexorable logic of the punctuational paradigm: Hugo de Vries on species selection. In Evolutionary Patterns and Processes. London: Linnean Society, pp. 3-18.

—— 1993. Fulfilling the spandrels of world and mind. In Jack Selzer, ed., Understanding Scientific Prose. Madison, Wisc: University of Wisconsin Press, pp. 310-336

—— 1993. How to analyze Burgess Shale disparity—a reply to Ridley. Paleobiology 19: 522-523.

—— 1993. Dinomania. New York Review of Books, 40 (August 12): 51-56.

—— 1993. Cordelia's dilemma. Natural History 102 (February): 10-18.

—— 1993. Dinosaur Deconstruction. Discover 14 (October): 108-113.

—— 1994. Ernst Mayr and the centrality of species. Evolution 48 (February): 31-35. JSTOR Preview

—— 1994. Dousing Diminutive Dennis's Debate. Natural History 103 (April): 4-10.

—— 1994. Hooking Leviathan by its past. Natural History 103 (May): 8-15.

—— 1994. Happy thoughts on a sunny day in New York City. Natural History 103 (August): 10-17.

—— 1994. Tempo and mode in the macroevolutionary reconstruction on Darwinism. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91 (15): 6764-6771.

—— 1994. The evolution of life on the earth. Scientific American 271 (Oct.): 85-91. PDF Format

—— 1994. The geometer of race. Discover 15 (Nov.): 65-69.

—— 1994. Curveball. The New Yorker 70 (Nov. 28): 139-149.

—— 1995. The pattern of life's history. In John Brockman The Third Culture. New York: Simon & Schuster, pp. 52-64.

—— 1995. Of tongue worms, velvet worms, and water bears. Natural History 104 (January): 6-15.

—— 1995. A task for Paleobiology at the threshold of majority. Paleobiology 21 (January): 1-14. JSTOR Preview

—— 1995. In the company of animals. Social Research. Vol. 63. No. 3.

—— 1996. Creating the creators. Discover 17 (October): 42-54.

—— 1996. Planet of the bacteria. The Washington Post Horizon, November 13, p. H1.

—— 1996. The dodo and the caucus race. Natural History 105 (Nov.): 22-33.

—— 1997. Cope's Rule as psychological artefact. Nature 385: 199-200.

—— 1997. Self-help for a hedgehog stuck on a molehill: struggle to inform the public about Darwinian evolution. Evolution 51 (3): 1020-1023.

—— 1997. As the worm turns. Natural History 106 (February).

—— 1997. Nonoverlapping magisteria. Natural History 106 (March): 16-22.

—— 1997. Theory of the living earth. Natural History 106 (May): 18-21, 58-64.

—— 1997. Kropotkin was no crackpot. Natural History 106 (June): 12-21.

—— 1997. Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring. Natural History 106 (September): 24-25.

—— 1997. A tale of two worksites. Natural History 106 (October): 18-22, 29, 62-68.

—— 1997. Room of one's own. Natural History 106 (November): 22, 64-70.

—— 1997. The paradox of the visibly irrelevant. Natural History 106 (Dec-Jan): 12-18, 60-66.

—— 1997. Darwinian Fundamentalism, part 1. New York Review of Books, June 12, pp. 34-37. Evolution: The Pleasures of Pluralism, part 2. New York Review of Books, June 26, pp. 47-52. [Reprinted in Italian: Part 1, 2, 3.]

—— 1997. The exaptive excellence of spandrels as a term and prototype. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 94: 10750-10755. PDF Format

—— 1997. An evolutionary perspective on strengths, fallacies, and confusions in the concept of native plants. In Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, Nature and Ideology, Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium on the History of Landscape Architecture, no. 18,  pp. 11-19.

—— 1997. Redrafting the tree of life. Proc. Amer. Philos. Soc. 141 (1): 30-54.

—— 1998. The Great Asymmetry. Science 279 (February 6): 812-813.

—— 1998. Gulliver's further travels: the necessity and difficulty of a hierarchical theory of selection. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B  353 (1366): 307-314.

—— 1998. An awful, terrible dinosaurian irony: Richard Owen, the "inventor" of dinosaurs, argued that their existance refuted the idea of evolution. Natural History 107 (February): 24-26, 61-68.

—— 1998. The internal brand of the scarlet W. Natural History 107 (March): 22-25, 70-78.

—— 1998. The lying stones of Wurzburg and Marrakech. Natural History 107 (April): 16-21, 82-90.

—— 1998. The sharp-eyed lynx, outfoxed by nature, part 1. Natural History 107 (May): 16-21, 70-72. The sharp-eyed lynx, outfoxed by nature, part 2. 107 (June): 23-27, 69-73.

—— 1998. On embryos and ancestors: Fossils of tiny embryos 570 million years old may well be the greatest paleontological discovery of our time. Natural History (July/August): 20-22, 58-65.

—— 1998. Stretching to fit: how life explores and colonizes the landscape of imaginable form. The Sciences 38 (July/August): 12-15.

—— 1998. Second-guessing the future. Natural History 107 (September): 20-29, 64-66.

—— 1998. Above all, do no harm. Natural History 107 (October): 16-24, 78-82.

—— 1998. In Gratuitous Battle. Civilization 5 (Oct./Nov.): 86-88.

—— 1998. Writing in the margins, part 1. Natural History 107 (November): 16-20. Capturing the center: Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier's scientific contributions, part 2. Natural History 107 (December): 14-25.

—— 1999. A division of worms: Jean Baptiste Lamarck's contributions to evolutionary theory, part 1. Natural History 108 (February): 18-22, 76-81. Branching through a wormhole, part 2. Natural History 108 (March): 24-27, 84-89.

—— 1999. Lyell's pillars of wisdom, part 1. Natural History 108 (April): 28-34, 87-89. Pozzuoli's pillars revisited, part 2. Natural History 108 (May): 24, 81-91.

—— 1999. Bacon, brought home: philosophy of Francis Bacon about natural world. Natural History 108 (June): 28-33, 72-78.

—— 1999. The human difference. The New York Times (July 2): A8.

—— 1999. The great physiologist of Heidelberg: Friedrich Tiedemann. Natural History 108 (July/Aug.): 26-29, 62-70.

—— 1999. Dorothy, it's really Oz. Time Magazine 154 (August 23): 59.

—— 1999. A Darwinian gentleman at Marx's funeral. Nat. Hist. 108 (Sept.): 32-33, 56-66.

—— 1999. When fossils were young. Natural History 108 (October): 24-26, 70-75.

—— 1999. Fiat money and booby birds. Forbes Magazine (October 11).

—— 1999. Boats & deckchairs: Marcel Duchamp's optical illusions. Natural History 108 (December): 32-44.

—— 2000. Deconstructing the "science wars" by reconstructing an old mold. Science 287 (January 14): 253-261.

—— 2000. What does the dreaded "E" word mean, anyway. Natural History 109 (February): 28-44.

—— 2000. Beyond competition. Paleobiology 26: 1-6.

—— 2000. Abscheulich! (atrocious!): Haeckel's distortions did not help Darwin. Nat. Hist. 109 (March): 42-49.

—— 2000. The first day of the rest of our life. Nat. Hist. 109 (April): 32-38, 82-86.

—— 2000. Will we figure out how life began? Time Magazine 155 (April 10): 92-93.

—— 2000. Jim Bowie's letter & Bill Buckner's legs. Natural History 109 (May): 26-40.

—— 2000. The Jew and the Jew Stone. Natural History 109 (June): 26-39.

—— 2000. The Narthex of San Marco and the Pangenetic Paradigm. Natural History 109 (July/August): 24-37.

—— 2000. Linnaeus's luck? Natural History 109 (September): 18-25, 66-76.

—— 2000. A taxonomist's taxonomist Whole Earth (Fall): 53-58.

—— 2000. Syphilis and the Shepherd of Atlantis. Nat. Hist. 109 (October): 38-42, 74-82.

—— 2000. Only human. Forbes Magazine (October 2).

—— 2000. Tales of a feathered tail. Natural History 109 (Nov.): 32-42.

—— 2000. Indecision 2000: heads or tails? The Boston Globe (November 30).

—— 2000. I have landed. Natural History 109 (Dec./January): 46-59.

—— 2000. The evolutionary definition of selective agency, validation of the theory of hiearchichical selection, and fallacy of the selfish gene. In Rama Shankar Singh, ed., Thinking about Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 208-234.

—— 2001. Humbled by the genome's mysteries. New York Times Op-Ed. Feb 19.

—— 2001. What only the embryo knows. New York Times Op-Ed. August 27.

—— 2001. September 11, 1901. <www.wtcgroundzerorelief.org> (September 11).

—— 2001. A time of gifts. New York Times Op-Ed. September 26. PDF Format

—— 2002. Baseball's reliquary. Natural History 111 (March): 56-60.



Co-authored Papers

Alberc, P., S. J. Gould, D. B. Oster, and D. B. Wake. 1979. Size and shape in ontogeny and phylogeny. Paleobiology 5 (3): 296-317.

Brosius, J., and S. J. Gould, 1992. On "genomenclature": A comprehensive (and respectful) taxonomy for pseudogenes and other "junk DNA." Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89 (November 15): 10706-10710.

Conway Morris, S., and S. J. Gould. 1998. Showdown on the Burgess Shale. Natural History 107 (Dec./Jan.): 48-55.

Eldredge, N., and S. J. Gould. 1972. Punctuated equilibria: an alternative to phyletic gradualism. In T.J.M. Schopf, ed., Models in Paleobiology. San Francisco: Freeman, Cooper and Company, pp. 82-115.

—— 1988. Punctuated equilibrium prevails. Nature 332: 211-212.

—— 1997. On punctuated equilibria. Science 276 (5311): 337-341.

Gould, S. J., and C. B. Calloway. 1980. Clams and brachiopods—ships that pass in the night? Paleobiology 6 (4): 383-396. JSTOR Preview

Gould, S. J., and N. Eldredge. 1971. Speciation and punctuated equilibria: an alternative to phyletic gradualism. G. S. A. Ann. Meeting, Washington, DC, Abstracts with Programs, pp. 584-585.

—— 1977. Punctuated equilibria: the tempo and mode of evolution reconsidered. Paleobiology 3: 115-151. PDF Format

—— 1983. Darwin's gradualism. Systematic Zool. 32: 444-445.

—— 1986. Punctuated equilibrium at the third stage. Systematic Zoology 35: 143-148. JSTOR Preview

—— 1988. Species selection: its range and power. Nature 334: 19.

—— 1993. Punctuated equilibrium comes of age. Nature 366 (6452): 223-227. PDF Format

Gould, S. J., and R. C. Lewontin. 1979. The spandrels of San Marco and the Panglossian paradigm: a critique of the adaptationist programme. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 205 (1161): 581-98. PDF Format PDF Format

Gould, S. J., and E. Lloyd. 1999. Individuality and adaptation across levels of selection: how shall we name and generalize the unit of Darwinism? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 96 (21): 11904-11909.

Gould, S. J., D. M. Raup, J. J. Sepkoski Jr., T. J. M. Schopf, and D. S. Simberloff. 1977. The shape of evolution: a comparison of real and random clades. Paleobiology 3 (1): 23-40.

Gould, S. J., and E. S. Vrba, 1982. Exaptation—a missing term in the science of form. Paleobiology 8 (1): 4-15.

Lloyd, E. A., and S. J. Gould. 1993. Species selection on variability. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 90 (2): 595-599.

Pilbeam, David and S. J. Gould. 1974. Size and scaling in human evolution. Science. 186 (Dec. 6): 892-901.

Raup, D. M. and S. J. Gould. 1974. Stochastic simulation and evolution of morphology—toward a nomothetic paleontology. Systematic Zool. 23 (3): 305-322.

Shearer, R. R., and S. J. Gould. 1999. Of two minds and one nature. Science 286 (Nov. 5): 1093-94.

Vrba, E. S., and S. J. Gould. 1986. The hierarchical expansion of sorting and selection; sorting and selection cannot be equated. Paleobiology. 12 (April): 217-228.


[ See full bibliography by Warren D. Allmen; Or more papers via PubMed ]


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I Have Landed




The Structure of Evolutionary Theory




The Lying Stones of Marrakech




Rocks of Ages




Leonardo's Mountain of Clams




Questioning the Millennium




Full House




Dinosaur in a Haystack




Wonderful Life




An Urchin in the Storm




Time's Arrow, Time's Cycle